“We for being a very hostile Taliban hotspot.

 “We sleep safely at night, because rough men
stand ready to visit violence on those who would harm us.” Winston Churchill As a veteran fighting with two tour, believing
I’m helping a victimless person without a voice. Protection those from anyone
trying to cause them harm. Even being a beacon of hope, trying to stand up for
what’s right. While the Taliban and the United States think they’re fighting
for the greater good. The United States are fighting for those who can’t fight
back and those waking up in fear. While the Taliban is defending their right to
enforce there strict interpretation of Sharia.

Patrolling
through the hot Afghanistan desert, sweat running down the side of my face.
Thirsty and tired reaching in my pack for my canteen of water. As I’m slowly
replenishing my thirst, I’m being cautious with each step I take, for which if
any wrong step can be my last. Remembering all of my training I start to slowly
scan my field of view. Trying to determine if anything is odd or out of place as
we’re trying to pressing forward over a hill, we come to a town called
Khannesin, in the Helmand province of Afghanistan. The pressure starts to build
up, entering a town known for being a very hostile Taliban hotspot. Thinking in
my head every scenario that could possible happen. I calm my mind trying not to
lose focus, if I lose my bearing my brother left and right to me could get hurt
or killed. I see kids playing like everything is normal, women shopping in food
markets, men on top of building staring at me. In my mind I picture a scene off
the movie Blackhawk Down.

In
the meantime, we come to the village elder asking him if he’s heard of any
unusual activities. The elder is talk to our translator, his body language
seems wrong. He seems scared, moving rapidly, looking around as if someone is
watching him. We decide to move to a higher ground, safer from any unexpected
enemies. We’re almost at the edge of the village, everything appears to be off,
and children had stopped playing, men on roof tops departed. There was a
silence that filled the atmosphere around us, as if something horrible is about
to happen.

 At the very moment, my Marine yells out
“contact to the rear”. Immediately gun fire started soaring, we took cover near
the side of the mud style house. My heart drops as all of this is happening
around me. I’m frozen like I’m in a trance like state. After all the training
I’ve had, I couldn’t imagine being scared for my life. Trying to gain my
composure back, I advance forward firing back at the enemy. My squad radios in
for support, but the nearest unit to us is over twenty miles out. Keeping our
cool we knew we had to hold the line at all cost. We couldn’t lose the village
to the Taliban, for the enemy will inflict severe punishment towards the
village. We stayed put, didn’t give up, we pushed on towards the enemies gun
fire. As we’re holding our position, one of my brother Marine gets shot, and
fully exposed towards the enemy’s fire. Without hesitation, I rush towards him
equally firing back at the enemy. Picking up my brother in a hurry, while
taking fire from the back as I’m sprinting towards cover, I get hit in the back
of my vest. Not worried about my own health I tend to him, constantly keeping
pressure on his wound, until the Doc comes to patch him up. Looking back at him
I tell him “you’re going to be okay brother you’re in good hands”. Tending back
to the fire fight unfazed by what just happened, I fire back at the enemy.

By
that time, the support unit coming from the east side of the village. Feeling relieved
when we hear them on the radio, they’re eager to get into the fight. As the
battle lasting over an hour, we finally corner the enemy. They drop down their
arms and surrender to us, we’re all mollified, and slowly advancing to them. As
we’re approaching the local start to come out of hiding, also pleased that we
put an end to these hostile men. The village elder and some locals come to us,
praising us, giving little that they have as a token of their appreciation.

Ultimately,
fire fights are unpredictable, they can have positive and negative
consequences. However, as a Marine it’s our duty to prepare, fight, and win,
whatever the uncertainties. Even though this war happened before I joined. I
still chosen to go and serve knowing the ultimate sacrifice. As many Marines
would say, “I want to be a part of something greater then myself, while serving
my country, growing as a man, and making my country proud.”